Why you should care about HTTPS

One basic internet security habit that everyone should remember is to avoid websites that aren’t secured with the HTTPS protocol. This is as simple as looking at your URL bar to check whether the URL string starts with “https” and whether there is a symbol of a closed padlock beside it.

You’ve Got (Compromised) Mail!

There are two kinds of people in this world: those who have been affected by Business Email Compromise (BEC) scams and those who don’t know they have been hit with BEC. It’s happening all the time, in your company, right now. People are getting emails that look official, from a realistic company email address, requesting some form of action; the trouble is, they are not real and they can lead to loss of data, loss of money, or both.

4 Social engineering scams to watch out for

Experts are constantly creating new security systems to protect individuals and businesses from hackers. From those who want to attend popular events like the Olympics to avoiding an angry boss, hackers are preying on gullible victims to circumvent network security systems and steal sensitive information.

HTTPS is something to care about

For all the time we spend discussing the complexity of internet security, there are a few simple things you can do. Avoiding websites that aren’t secured with the HTTPS protocol is one of them. It’s a habit that can be developed with a better understanding of what the padlock icon in your web browser’s address […]

Google weighs in on account hijacking

According to experts, passwords shouldn’t be the only way you defend your accounts. After all, hackers have plenty of tricks and tools to steal them. So to help businesses fully understand the risks involved, Google conducted a study on the causes of account hijacking.

Gmail gets anti-phishing enhancements

Although hackers continue to develop new viruses and bug exploits, the most effective weapon in their arsenal is a simple email. All a would-be cybercriminal has to do is write a convincing message (or pretend to be a trustworthy entity) to persuade a victim to download a malware-ridden file or surrender their personal information.